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Bell County Master Gardeners host bi-annual plant sale

by / 0 Comments / 67 View / April 18, 2016

By Jonathan Allison, Correspondent

Started in 2008 to bring in more gardeners the Bell County Master Gardeners spring and fall sale help educate Texas farmers on how to plant in Texas.

Located in front of the Agri-life building on N Main every fall and spring, the Master Gardeners Association sells plants for a fundraiser and keeps the farming community informed.

Lou Ann Hight with the Master Gardeners Association said,” we used to have our own green house until Don Wyatt started bringing in local growers to sell people…we provide plants that need as little of care as possible.”

The fall and spring sale have different kinds of vegetation, and the plants are especially for the central Texas climate. Some plants aren’t available all-year due to weather restrictions. You may find a list on agrilifeextension.tamu.edu

“We set up every fall and spring with our home-made compost distributing flyers, and we are always successful,” said Wayne Lovett of Bell County WCID #1 Regional Compost facility. The compost facility specializes in making dirt or compost and you may get 1 cubic yard for $10.

The Master Gardeners is a volunteer organization in which all applicants must attend 5-month training.

Master Gardener’s responsibilities include helping within the community however needed and supporting Lyle Zoeller, the Extension Agent of Bell County. The Extension Agent is responsible for any vegetation needs within the area.
“Most of our plant inventory comes from Gabriel Valley Farms out in Georgetown, Tx. and they are all organically grown,” said Wayne Schirner, Master Gardener.

The sale has different items for spring and fall. The fall sale starts Sep. 17 and it is too late for a vegetable like tomatoes by then.

Compost is what is used by the Master Gardeners Association. Compost helps clean-up, helps prevent pollution, improves water retention, provides source of nutrients and organic matter, and improves soil.

“Not a lot of people realize how important this is, and that people are taking time out to do this only because they love it,” said Kathy Love, Plant Sales Coordinator.

According to Texasalmanac.com central Texas has cracking clay and it is due to the sun drying out the clay. The soils in central Texas are difficult to plant in and master gardeners recommend using compost.

For more information on how to plant vegetation in Texas contact Lyle Zoeller at 254-993-5305 or fax at 254-933-5312. More information also available on txmg.org.